Acceptance of one another and each individual’s right to walk her own path is the solution. If you feel like sobriety sucks, you need more support. Even if you are making one small choice to improve how you feel each day, like working out more or eating better, track it. You can then consistently look back, see how far you’ve come, and assess what you have accomplished along the way.

  • One of my college friends used to get drunk and aggressively challenge someone to start naming states so that he could name their respective capitals.
  • Personally, I always thought drunk people were fun, and I didn’t want my own poop relationship with alcohol to stand out.
  • But there are some general things you can expect to happen.
  • There are exceptions to this, like if someone alludes to their own struggle with alcohol, and then I might offer up a bit more of my personal experience.
  • Here are some surprising (and not-so-surprising) occurrences that will inevitably happen to your relationships, your identity, even your free time, and how I’ve learned to deal with each one.
  • For many, it’s a lifelong process of unlearning coping mechanisms that revolve around substances like alcohol or cannabis, and it’s also a process of relearning how to live life sober and stay sober.

One of my college friends used to get drunk and aggressively challenge someone to start naming states so that he could name their respective capitals. He would scream the answers and taunt everyone in the room. To this day, we have no idea why he was so mad.

Ugh, drunks love to get all Dr. Phil on their relationship issues.

It’s an opportunity to grow into your bones, and every single crap thing that happens to you on the way only makes you stronger. Why do people, who have been sober for years, behave inappropriately with alarming regularity? Recently, I was asked this question in group therapy (the exact words have been edited as they were not fit to print).

As with most problems, the solution is as difficult or as simple as we make it. Sometimes, consider how your behavior has affected others. Or maybe those crotchety old-timers like to complain about life. Or the newcomer has unrealistic expectations and judges others unfairly.

And have you heard? That drunk one loves [insert person here].

Staying sober may require several strategies and supports, including seeking professional and peer support. There are people for which sobriety is a deal-breaker. This might seem like a terrible thing; this is not a terrible thing. This is a JOYOUS and wonderful thing because it easily sorts out the ones that have a weird relationship with alcohol, or the ones that just aren’t for you. It will hurt (pretty bad at first), but in time you will come to see it as the gift it is—and you won’t waste time getting to know the wrong person.

That said, while “recovery” and “sobriety” are different terms, they’re also used interchangeably in some instances. Plus, being in recovery typically involves maintaining sobriety, so the two are somewhat intertwined. Like that guy from that probably stolen Dane Cook sketch, drunk people just “gotta dance.” A couple beers and everyone is oblivious to their surroundings.

Drunk people be like: IDGAF.

Sobriety doesn’t necessarily turn you into Liz Lemon, but it can give you the clarity to understand that you’ve been Liz Lemon your whole life. If you’re like most drinkers, you’ve likely surrounded yourself at some point with a group of people who also drink. I’d argue that many of us gravitated to a group of friends who have drinking habits that align with our own, and we did this because we didn’t https://ecosoberhouse.com/ want sober friends. It’s been over six years since I first started seriously questioning my relationship with alcohol and considered a life without it. That’s six hard, beautiful, glorious years during which I not only stopped drinking, but also finally moved on from all recreational drugs as well as a history of bulimia. As you get going, keep a simple chart or use an app that tracks your progress.

being sober sucks

You can always improve how you fare in sobriety by looking at where you can improve your quality of life. You are not a slave to your emotions or your addiction. You can choose to sit where you are for a moment, assess, and figure out a way forward. By Michelle Pugle

Michelle Pugle, being sober sucks MA, MHFA is a freelance health writer as seen in Healthline, Health, Everyday Health, Psych Central, and Verywell. How you deal with this one is you use it and you own it and you live it, because there is nothing more beautiful than a human who has no other choice but to be themself.